$110,000 :: 29565 S RIVER RD, Harrison Township MI, 48045-3026

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3 beds, 1 bath
Home size: 1,178 sq ft
Lot Size: 10,890 sq ft
Added: 09/21/18, Last Updated: 09/21/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 21507741
Community: Harrison Twp (50015)
Tract: CAMPAU’S MACOMB PARK
Status: Active

Ranch home in Harrison Twp. This home has 3 bedrooms and 1 full bathroom. It is on a crawl space. Detached Garage.

Listed with Braven Enterprises LLC


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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7 Benefits of a Federal Reserve Interest Rate Hike

(TNS)—Interest rates are going up. The Federal Reserve in June hiked rates for the second time in 2018, and there could be two more rate hikes before the end of the year, including one at this month’s Fed meeting.

Sure, the increases mean it will cost more to borrow—but you’ll benefit from getting better rates on high-yield certificates of deposit.

Healthier returns on CDs are only one gain from the Fed’s rate-raising campaign. Here’s how you can take advantage of other positive outcomes from Fed rate increases.

  1. Higher Returns for Savers
    If you’re a saver, low interest rates have brought about the financial equivalent of a long drought. Any improvement, even modest, is welcome and overdue.

“Interest rates have been so low for so long that many people have fallen out of the habit of rate shopping,” says Robert Frick, corporate economist for Navy Federal Credit Union. “But now that rates are rising, they should get back into the habit and will be seeing bigger payouts from their accounts, especially certificates of deposit. This is especially important for people on fixed incomes.”

  1. Tamed Inflation
    Most broad-based measures of prices indicate inflation has continued to remain under control in the U.S. in recent years. The central bank’s target for inflation is 2 percent, but inflation has yet to hit the bull’s eye on a sustained basis, as measured by personal consumption expenditures, or PCE.

If the Fed achieves its objectives in steering the economy, inflation should remain under control.

A positive inflation scenario after a rate increase might include “lower prices of imported consumer goods, due to a likely higher exchange value of the dollar if our domestic rate increases are not matched by policy tightening in other major economies,” says Daniil Manaenkov, U.S. forecasting specialist at the Research Seminar in Quantitative Economics at the University of Michigan.

  1. More Lending
    A credit bubble rightfully received some of the blame for the financial crisis in 2007. In the aftermath, lending came to a complete stop.

Lending has resumed. “Banks may have a greater incentive to loan out reserves at higher interest rates, and thI increased flow of additional credit would boost economic growth,” says Sean Snaith, director of the Institute for Economic Competitiveness at the University of Central Florida.

  1. More Interest Income for Retirees
    As a rate boost brings better returns to savings vehicles, senior citizens should enjoy better paydays by putting their money in CDs and savings accounts. “Higher interest rates on CDs and other financial instruments will particularly help older Americans trying to live on their retirement savings,” says Lynn Reaser, chief economist at Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego.

As the population ages in coming years, many more Americans will come to appreciate even modest increases in interest income during retirement when they buy certificates of deposit.

  1. Stronger Dollar to Boost Purchasing Power
    As the Fed continues to boost rates (and with the outlook for more rate hikes to come), the U.S. dollar gets more support. Ultimately, that means more purchasing power with the greenback compared with other currencies.

Predicting moves in the foreign exchange market is difficult, but Snaith and other economists say the dollar could strengthen further as the Fed boosts rates.

Fed tightening “is likely to mean a somewhat higher dollar, so people traveling to Europe will do well,” says Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington.

  1. Stocks Will Trade on Fundamentals
    As the Federal Reserve embarks on what officials have called “normalization” (that is, a backing away from record-low rates), stock prices may start to make more sense and not reflect the central bank’s easy monetary policy quite so much.

“A normalization of rates would return the focus to market fundamentals and off of focusing on the nuances of each Fed statement,” says David Nice, former senior economist at DS Economics in Chicago.

  1. Would-Be Homebuyers May Get off the Fence
    As the Fed continues to raise rates, higher mortgage rates likely will follow. If the prospect of higher mortgage rates compels you to a home sooner than later, you won’t be alone.

“Higher mortgage rates could push buyers off the fence—increasing demand, increasing prices and increasing home equity so that more people can sell their homes,” says Joel Naroff, president of Naroff Economic Advisors in Holland, Pa.

©2018 Bankrate.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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$195,000 :: 38530 Winkler, Harrison Township MI, 48045

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3 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,764 sq ft
Lot Size: 19,602 sq ft
Added: 09/11/18, Last Updated: 09/21/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 31359616
Community: Harrison Twp (50015)
Tract: Winklers Subdivision
The price of this listing was last reduced on 9/21/2018 by 17%
Status: Active

Are you looking for lots of space, inside and out? Here’s the place you’ve been looking for! This custom built, full brick Harrison Township Ranch is on a beautiful 1/2 acre lot. The home has 3 generously sized bedrooms, 2 full baths, first floor laundry, an attached 2.5 car garage and a partially finished basement. The family room features a beautiful natural fireplace and lots of space. The large kitchen has Oak cabinets, a peninsula with lots of counter space & door wall to patio. The front room is brightly lit by large bay window. The home has newer energy efficient vinyl windows and newer custom front door. The over-sized yard (100 x 198) is entirely fenced and includes a second detached garage (21×15) for your boat or yard equipment. This fantastic Harrison Township location features Lanse Creuse Schools and is close to Lake St. Clair, Clinton River and I-94. Immediate occupancy. Macomb County Septic Certification Complete. No FHA or VA.

Listed with Real Living Kee Realty-Clinton Twp


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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Housing in 2020: Construction Costs Grow, Mortgage Rates Slow

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Where will housing be in 2020? According to the latest Metrostudy predictions, if all continues on its current track, construction costs could continue to increase, and mortgage rates could reel in.

While rates have increased in the last six months, impacting affordability, the rise is not significant according to historical trends, says Mark Bound, chief economist and senior vice president at Metrostudy, a provider of primary and secondary market information to the housing and residential construction industries. In the long term, Boud predicts mortgage interest rates will top out at 5.8 percent in 2020 and 2021, eventually being pulled down by slower economic growth—and because of tighter lending practices, the market environment will not become as dire as the last housing bubble.

As for inventory, it is significantly under-supplied, while homes are increasingly overvalued; however, the risk of a price collapse is small due to the tight market, and Boud expects the cycle of under-supply to plateau in 2020. The lack of new inventory is, in part, in response to trade increases, as many of the imposed tariffs—specifically the 20-plus percent tariff on lumber imports, and 10 and 25 percent tariffs on aluminum and steel imports, respectively—directly impact construction efforts.

These factors could lead to an increase in overall construction timelines, as well as an increase in construction costs by at least $2,000 per house, according to Boud. More homes in the upper price ranges are being built, while inventory under $400,000 is lower, in some cases. Overall, the national market is becoming top-heavy, which typically only occurs where land is more expensive, such as in California, Boud says.

Remodeling activity continues to rise in response to homeowners staying in their homes for longer, as well as the continuing trend toward purchasing existing homes, which triggers renovations. According to Boud, this is most common in coastal markets, or markets that have high appreciation rates, such as Texas.

Something to watch? Inflation. Boud says inflationary pressures are slowly building—inflation rose from 2.4 percent in March to 2.9 percent in August—but in a few years, the national debt could slow economic growth, which, in turn, could slow down rising interest rates.

Another concern? The current downward trend of the 2-10 Treasury yield spread, which could see negative figures in about a year, may be a sign that a recession is in the cards.

However, the current economy is healthy, Boud says. In the past 12 months, 2.4 million jobs have been generated, increasing demand for housing and pushing the unemployment rate down. Additionally, housing starts are fairly stable, forecasted to be 1.28 million in 2018, and increasing to 1.33 million in 2019 and 1.345 million in 2020, before plateauing.

Liz Dominguez is RISMedia’s associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at ldominguez@rismedia.com. For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

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$111,000 :: 27740 PONCHARTRAIN, Update MI, 48045

3 beds, 6 baths
Home size: 1,200 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 09/21/18, Last Updated: 09/21/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 419156
Community: Harrison Twp (50015)
Tract: RIVIERA ON THE LAKE
Status: Sold

LAKE ACCESS AT END OF STREET WITH BOAT LAUNCHAND BEACH…IMMACULATE 3 BDRM WITH FIREPLACE,AND UPDATES: ROOF, FURNACE, WINDOWS, CARPETING,STEEL ENTRY DOORS…BEAUTIFUL OAK KITCHEN..1/2BATH OFF MASTER BDRM..7 HOUSES FROM LAKE!!

Listed with RE/MAX Suburban, Inc.


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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Borrower Beware: Soon It Will Be Tough to Unload College Loans

(TNS)—Here’s a good reason to think twice about taking out piles of student loans after watching a catchy TV ad for a for-profit college.

The U.S. Department of Education is on a path to make it far tougher to get federal college loans forgiven using the argument that the school cheated you out of a good education by misleading you about job prospects or engaging in fraud.

The new rule—now under a public comment period—would apply to students seeking loans after July 1, 2019.

Consumer watchdogs, of course, charge that bad actors are getting a pass here. It would be up to students to prove that the school knowingly made false statements. What’s most troubling is that we’re often talking about low-income students, minority students or military veterans who have taken out loans to attend for-profit schools as they seek to build a better life and get training for a good-paying job.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has said the proposal lays out clear rules schools must follow, while protecting students from fraud. The administration maintains that the current rules had been too broadly interpreted, leaving taxpayers on the hook and opening the door for frivolous claims.

Yet many borrowers could be burned here. We’re looking at yet another reminder of why it’s savvy to be skeptical when costly for-profit colleges aggressively recruit you and make breathless promises about grants and financing.

All graduates don’t get good jobs.
Some schools do go out of business unexpectedly; others provide misleading claims and don’t provide a degree that employers really value.

Two years ago, for example, ITT Tech shut its doors following sanctions by the U.S. Department of Education. The sudden shutdown meant that students were able to seek a discharge of federal student loans—but not private student loans—from the federal government. For-profit Corinthian College closed its campuses in 2015, leaving students unable to complete their programs.

Often consumers find the pitch surrounding some for-profit programs very appealing. They’re looking to get on the fast path to a new, more promising career. Yet many students borrow heavily—too heavily—to chase those dreams.

Robin Howarth, senior researcher for the Center for Responsible Lending, says there’s growing concern that students attending for-profit schools can end up owing a great deal of money but only have limited potential for obtaining a job with a substantial paycheck in return.

The consumer watchdog group released a report in June that indicated, for example, that students face very high tuition and fees at for-profit colleges in order to receive training for healthcare support jobs. Many students borrow most of the money, but the jobs they find don’t pay enough to cover their living expenses and all that debt.

“Students need to pay very close attention to what kind of earnings are achieved,” Howarth says.

It’s important to look beyond average salaries in the medical field and look at the kinds of jobs obtained by students who attended that program.

Many times, Howarth says, earnings for similar programs are less when the student has attended a for-profit school than if the student studied a similar program at a public or private nonprofit college.

Often, Howarth says students may be better off obtaining training at a community college at a far lower cost.

Proving fraud isn’t easy for student borrowers.
Kurt O’Keefe, a Grosse Pointe Woods attorney who has a blog called “Discharge Student Loans,” says student borrowers would still face significant challenges under the new rules, if they want to try to get loans forgiven if they claim they were defrauded by the schools.

“Failing to deliver requisite skills and knowledge is a tough one to litigate,” O’Keefe says. “The schools will say the student just failed to learn.”

In addition, he noted that many who find themselves in such circumstances are from lower-income families and cannot afford to take legal action.

“A right that costs money to exercise, legal fees for your lawyer, does not help much when you are talking about people who cannot pay their loans to begin with,” O’Keefe says.

O’Keefe says the real problem is one that he refers to as “the triangle.”

“The schools get the money whether the student gets value or not, the government (usually) lends the money and chases the borrower for repayment. The schools have no skin in the game,” he says.

Part of the draft rules would allow the Department of Education to seek reimbursement for forgiven student loans from the institutions and that is good, he says.

“It would hurt scam schools and schools with scam programs, and could be used against any institution, public or private,” O’Keefe says.

Under a current regulation, borrowers with federal student loans might be able to get debt relief when they claim they were misled about the cost and quality of the education. It’s called the “Borrower Defense to Repayment” rule.

The Education Department notes students may be eligible for borrower defense regardless of whether your school closed or you are otherwise eligible for loan forgiveness under other laws.

Consumers with questions or pending claims regarding borrower defense may call the Department of Education’s hotline at 855-279-6207 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays. As of January, the Department of Education has received 138,989 claims—and 23 percent had been processed. The bulk of the claims processed were associated with Corinthian and ITT.

New rules would save the government billions.
The proposed change in regulations would significantly limit the situations under which borrowers could qualify for financial relief, says Mark Kantrowitz, publisher and vice president of Research for Savingforcollege.com.

“The changes appear intended to primarily reduce costs to the federal government,” Kantrowitz says. “While the previous regulations may have been too permissive—allowing cancellation of debt based on just accusation of wrongdoing—the new regulations go too far in the opposite direction. As the lender, the federal government should have some responsibility to the borrower.”

It’s estimated that the new proposal could save the federal government nearly $13 billion over the next decade.

It’s a substantial savings, given that the Education Department had put a $14.9 billion price tag over the next decade for the program under the more-broadly defined regulations.

The new regulations would permit the U.S. Department of Education to provide partial relief instead of cancelling all of the borrower’s loans, depending on the level of harm suffered, he says.

Under the new rules, borrowers would need to prove that the college intended to defraud—a very difficult standard.

Also significant: Only borrowers already in default could apply for relief under the proposed rules. As a result, a borrower who was actively repaying the loans wouldn’t get help.

“This might lead some borrowers to intentionally default on their federal student loans,” Kantrowitz says.

Defaulting can seriously harm your credit score, and drive up borrowing costs when you want to take out a car loan, home mortgage or open up a credit card. A default will be reported to credit bureaus.

Most often, you do not want to go into default. If you default on student loans, you will be subject to collection charges and wage garnishment, and the government can seize your income tax refund, too.

©2018 Detroit Free Press
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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$134,000 :: 28090 FAIR OAKS LN #18 3, HARRISON Township MI, 48045

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2 beds, 1 bath
Home size: 1,000 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 08/04/18, Last Updated: 09/21/18
Property Type: Condo/Townhouse/Co-Op
MLS Number: 58031356049
Community: Harrison Twp
Tract: MAPLE FOREST
Status: Sold

Sharp, Spacious, Clean & Updated Brick Ranch Condo with Nicely Finished Basement and Full Bath. Open Kitchen/Living Room Concept with Fireplace. Main Level Bath has Tub & Separate Shower Enclosure. Large Hallway Closet Can Convert to First Floor Laundry Closet. Nicely Decorated. All Appliances can stay. Back-up Sump Pump. Newer Carpet (2017). 5,000 Watt Generator can stay. Close to Metro Beach. And Walk/Bike Trails, Shopping & I-94.Association Fee of $225.Includes Water. 1 Year Home Warranty Included

Listed with Advantage Realty


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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Credit Freeze: A Misunderstood Freebie That You Actually Want

(TNS)—Just one year ago, consumers woke up and discovered that hackers had one heck of a field day with their Social Security numbers and other information in a massive data breach at Equifax. Equifax’s screw-up would forever leave millions just that much more vulnerable to ID theft. Face it: It’s not like you can change the locks on the side door. Once hacked, your Social Security number is out there indefinitely.

Beginning September 21, though, a new federal law will help consumers stop intruders in their tracks. The three big credit reporting agencies—Equifax, Experian and TransUnion—will be required to offer you a credit freeze, free of charge. Such a freeze will restrict access to your credit file and help stop crooks from opening credit cards in your name.

Also starting September 21, parents across the country will be able to get a free credit freeze for children under age 16. A child’s credit file would be frozen until the child is old enough to use credit.

To be sure, the new law is but a minuscule response to the widespread outrage expressed by consumers just a year ago. Even so, it is a key step for regaining some control over our data.

Yet there’s a not-so-small challenge ahead: Many people may have absolutely no idea what a credit freeze actually is and how it works, according to new research conducted by a team at the University of Michigan School of Information in Ann Arbor. Amazingly, some consumers wrongly think that a credit freeze stops them from using their own credit cards.

So what exactly is a credit freeze?
Yixin Zou, a U-M doctoral student, says she was astonished to hear consumers disclose that they somehow associated a freeze with stopping the use of their own credit cards or limiting their own access to their existing credit cards.

“I’m quite surprised,” says Zou.

Perhaps some consumers associated a freeze with times that credit card issuers send out new cards and stop us from using old ones because the numbers of the old ones have been breached.

Perhaps others remember tips that once suggested putting your credit card in the freezer in a baggie to control spending.

Who knows?

Instead, a credit freeze stops many but not all businesses and others from reviewing your credit file.

The consumer who signs up for a voluntary credit freeze is given a PIN—a PIN that you want to keep track of—to use when you want to unfreeze that credit file in order to apply for new credit.

Under the new law, if a consumer asks for a freeze online or by phone, the credit reporting agency has to put the freeze in place no later than the next business day, according to a Federal Trade Commission blog.

If the consumer wants to lift the freeze—for example, to finance a new phone or fridge—that has to happen within an hour.

“It’s just assumed that people know what a credit freeze is,” says Florian Schaub, U-M assistant professor of Information, whose research focuses on security and privacy issues.

Schaub says too often “credit freeze” is just swept into the jargon in the industry—jargon that many consumers simply do not understand. Many times, people only fully understand a credit freeze once they’re actual victims of ID theft and told that a credit freeze is essential.

And what is a fraud alert?
Some consumers had a hard time understanding the term “fraud alert,” as well. Some thought the alerts were when a bank or credit union would text you when fraudulent activity was detected on your account.

Instead, placing a fraud alert on your credit file actually means that you’re adding a red flag, if you will, to your credit report to alert a lender to carefully verify your identity before making a loan.

Under the new law, a fraud alert will last one year, instead of 90 days. If a victim of identity theft, you’d still be able to extend a fraud alert for seven years.

We’re not talking about buying some service or signing up for some credit lock product that might have certain strings and conditions, as well as a fee. This is a free freeze.

But all that jargon—freezes, locks, alerts—can truly confuse consumers who are already overwhelmed in their financial lives.

Schaub says the credit bureaus don’t have much incentive to carefully explain things like credit freezes or fraud alerts; after all, their business model is to collect and aggregate our information to provide to lenders who want to sell us loans.

“We, as citizens, are not their customers,” Schaub says. “What makes them money is sharing our credit reports with other businesses.”

Everyone has something to lose.
Many times, particularly lower-income consumers wrongly believe that they have little reason to worry and don’t really need to protect their data after a breach, according to the U-M researchers. Those consumers thought that scammers would target people who were more affluent.

“They would say ‘I’ve got nothing to lose. Why would an identity thief go after me?’” Schaub says. He says other research has shown that people of low socioeconomic status are disproportionately affected by identity theft.

The U-M research found that most consumers took little to no action to protect themselves despite the risk of identity theft. Some consumers underestimated the likelihood of becoming a victim.

Some consumers reported that they were likely to delay taking the time to handle any security-related tasks until they’re actually harmed—even though recovering from ID theft can be far more time-consuming than prevention, researchers say.

Of course, ID thieves can see huge payouts using your stolen Social Security number for all sorts of things, including getting medical care or poaching your medical insurance, filing a fraudulent tax refund (which stops you from getting your refund cash until you take steps to clear up the matter), and filing for unemployment benefits or even Social Security benefits using your number.

Putting a credit freeze won’t stop all fraud, of course, including someone who tries to file a fraudulent tax return to collect refund cash.

The Equifax breach was significant because of the kind of data that was involved. On Sept. 7, 2017, the major credit reporting agency announced a “cybersecurity incident” where crooks gained access to Social Security numbers, birthdates, names and addresses. And in some cases, Equifax noted that some partial driver’s license numbers were stolen, too. The incident involved data for nearly 147 million people.

Without the change in the law, many consumers in several states had to pay a fee of around $10 or so for each freeze they placed on their credit files, or $30 for putting a freeze with the three agencies. Then there could be a fee of $10 or so for lifting that freeze when you wanted to take out a loan or open a credit card. Fees could be waived under certain circumstances, such as when someone has stolen your identity to open credit.

Under the new law, you can unfreeze your report at no cost, too.
Enabling consumers to get free freezes, of course, should encourage people who don’t have a lot of extra cash to consider putting a freeze on their credit.

After the Equifax breach, U.S. consumers—whether they were part of the breach or not—were allowed to sign up to freeze their credit reports at Equifax if they made a move before July 1. But the new law will go much further and offer free freezes indefinitely.

The U-M research involved in-person, comprehensive interviews with 24 consumers in the Ann Arbor area during the first few months of 2018.

Typically, while those consumers had heard about the Equifax breach, more than half of them had done nothing to further protect themselves and prevent identity theft afterwards, the research concluded.

The key to all of this, of course, is that it’s up to consumers to lock that door.

“The level of vulnerability is pretty stunning,” says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney at the National Consumer Law Center in Boston.

Wu says being able to obtain a free credit freeze for children could be more important than some families realize—even though children wouldn’t be part of a data breach such as Equifax.

“Children are lucrative targets for ID theft because they have clean records,” Wu says. In many cases, though, children become victims of ID theft because parents or other family members steal the child’s ID to apply for utilities, such as electricity.

Wu says consumers need to realize that the data that’s out there can be used now or years from now.

“Now how do you prevent ID theft given that this information is out there?” Wu says. “Most people’s Social Security, birthdates, are just hanging out there. It can never be taken back.”

The U-M researchers concluded that it’s not enough for companies to simply report data breaches. The researchers maintain that companies should clearly inform consumers on how they’re affected, what their risks are once ID thieves can get access to that data and what immediate steps consumers can take to protect themselves.

Even if not affected by a data breach, people should consider placing a credit freeze with each of the three credit bureaus after September 21, as it substantially limits potential abuse of one’s credit report, Schaub says.

The new law—called the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act—also provides that if you have guardianship, power of attorney, or conservatorship over an adult, you can get a free credit freeze for that person after providing proof of authority.

When is a credit freeze a bad idea?
Like many tools, this strategy isn’t for everyone. If you’re about to apply for a mortgage, a car loan or a student loan, don’t take out a credit freeze before you get the loan. If you do, you’re going to have to unfreeze that credit report before you can get approved for a loan. You’ll need to consider the hassle factor.

Some entities, such as insurers and employers, are exempted under the new federal law and would still have access to your credit report even under a free credit freeze. The Federal Trade Commission notes that your report could still be released to your existing creditors or to debt collectors acting on their behalf, as well. Government agencies may have access in response to a court or administrative order, a subpoena, or a search warrant.

Most consumers are being more watchful when it comes to checking their credit card and bank statements every month to make sure that the charges are accurate or looking at their credit reports, says Matt Schulz, chief industry analysts for CompareCards by LendingTree.

“Equifax may have been the tipping point where people from now on just assume their information is already out there,” Schulz says.

How do you get a free credit freeze?
If you won’t need new credit soon, then a credit freeze may be for you—but remember, the free credit freezes for all do not hit until September 21. Under the new law, the Federal Trade Commission and the credit reporting agencies must set up webpages to make it easier for consumers to take advantage of their new rights. Those links will be in operation when the law takes effect, according to the FTC blog.

If you want a free freeze, you’d need to contact each of the agencies individually. Here are some current numbers:

  • Equifax’s automated security freeze system can be reached at 800-349-9960
  • Experian can be reached at 888-397-3742.
  • TransUnion is at 888-909-8872.

You’re going to need to supply data such as your name, address, date of birth, Social Security number and other personal information.

After receiving your freeze request, each credit reporting company will send you a confirmation letter containing a unique PIN (personal identification number) or password. Keep the PIN or password in a safe place. You will need it if you choose to lift the freeze.

©2018 Detroit Free Press
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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$195,000 :: 38530 WINKLER, HARRISON Township MI, 48045

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3 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,764 sq ft
Lot Size: 19,602 sq ft
Added: 09/11/18, Last Updated: 09/21/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 58031359616
Community: Harrison Twp
Tract: WINKLERS SUBDIVISION
The price of this listing was last reduced on 9/21/2018 by 17%
Status: Active

Are you looking for lots of space, inside and out? Here’s the place you’ve been looking for! This custom built, full brick Harrison Township Ranch is on a beautiful 1/2 acre lot. The home has 3 generously sized bedrooms, 2 full baths, first floor laundry, an attached 2.5 car garage and a partially finished basement. The family room features a beautiful natural fireplace and lots of space. The large kitchen has Oak cabinets, a peninsula with lots of counter space & door wall to patio. The front room is brightly lit by large bay window. The home has newer energy efficient vinyl windows and newer custom front door. The over-sized yard (100 x 198) is entirely fenced and includes a second detached garage (21×15) for your boat or yard equipment. This fantastic Harrison Township location features Lanse Creuse Schools and is close to Lake St. Clair, Clinton River and I-94. Immediate occupancy. Macomb County Septic Certification Complete. No FHA or VA.

Listed with Real Living Kee Realty-Clinton Twp


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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Housing in 2020: Construction Costs Grow, Mortgage Rates Slow

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Where will housing be in 2020? According to the latest Metrostudy predictions, if all continues on its current track, construction costs could continue to increase, and mortgage rates could reel in.

While rates have increased in the last six months, impacting affordability, the rise is not significant according to historical trends, says Mark Bound, chief economist and senior vice president at Metrostudy, a provider of primary and secondary market information to the housing and residential construction industries. In the long term, Boud predicts mortgage interest rates will top out at 5.8 percent in 2020 and 2021, eventually being pulled down by slower economic growth—and because of tighter lending practices, the market environment will not become as dire as the last housing bubble.

As for inventory, it is significantly under-supplied, while homes are increasingly overvalued; however, the risk of a price collapse is small due to the tight market, and Boud expects the cycle of under-supply to plateau in 2020. The lack of new inventory is, in part, in response to trade increases, as many of the imposed tariffs—specifically the 20-plus percent tariff on lumber imports, and 10 and 25 percent tariffs on aluminum and steel imports, respectively—directly impact construction efforts.

These factors could lead to an increase in overall construction timelines, as well as an increase in construction costs by at least $2,000 per house, according to Boud. More homes in the upper price ranges are being built, while inventory under $400,000 is lower, in some cases. Overall, the national market is becoming top-heavy, which typically only occurs where land is more expensive, such as in California, Boud says.

Remodeling activity continues to rise in response to homeowners staying in their homes for longer, as well as the continuing trend toward purchasing existing homes, which triggers renovations. According to Boud, this is most common in coastal markets, or markets that have high appreciation rates, such as Texas.

Something to watch? Inflation. Boud says inflationary pressures are slowly building—inflation rose from 2.4 percent in March to 2.9 percent in August—but in a few years, the national debt could slow economic growth, which, in turn, could slow down rising interest rates.

Another concern? The current downward trend of the 2-10 Treasury yield spread, which could see negative figures in about a year, may be a sign that a recession is in the cards.

However, the current economy is healthy, Boud says. In the past 12 months, 2.4 million jobs have been generated, increasing demand for housing and pushing the unemployment rate down. Additionally, housing starts are fairly stable, forecasted to be 1.28 million in 2018, and increasing to 1.33 million in 2019 and 1.345 million in 2020, before plateauing.

Liz Dominguez is RISMedia’s associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at ldominguez@rismedia.com. For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Housing in 2020: Construction Costs Grow, Mortgage Rates Slow appeared first on RISMedia.

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